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The video archive

The video clips presented at forageforhorses.com are gathered here!

 


Horses are amazing hindgut fermenters! Here AgrD Sara Muhonen talks about the gastro-intestinal tract and how to choose the right forage for your horse.

 

 


It is possible to quickly determine the dry matter (DM) content of grass by drying in the microwave oven, but be careful as it can easily catch fire! Therefore, separate the drying in shorter intervals. The special fibre plates (from Ekolag.se) decreases the fire hazard and makes the drying more effective. The sample should be chopped and 10.0 g is enough, but such a small sample has to be taken and mixed carefully to be representative. The scale needs to have an accuracy of 0.1 g (available at Ekolag.se).

Do like this: Mix the sample in a plastic bag with air, like in the video above. Weigh up 10.0 g on a kitchen paper on the tared scale (press Tare or T to get the tare weight), then spread out the grass, place it on the fibre plate and put it in the microwave oven. Run on full effect for 30 seconds. Weigh out the sample and repeat 30 sec intervals in the microwave oven until the weight does not change more than 0.2 g. Never leave the microwave when it is running! In the video’s example the weight stops at 3.3 g, which according to experience represents 32%.

 

 


It is important to analyze your forage to know the nutritive content and the dry matter concentration. Baled forage and also wrapped bales can easily be sampled with a core sample. Here STICKIT 2 (from Ekolag AB) is shown which is driven by a battery drilling machine via an adapter. Since nutritive content and dry matter concentration can vary from bale to bale samples should be taken from several bales, at large consignments it’s better to sample at least 10 bales. Cover the holes after the core sample thoroughly with silage tape (adhesive tape). When sampling for hygienic analyzes it’s important to clean the drill to avoid contamination between different forage consignments.

 

 


Spring is here, it’s getting warmer and warmer. Then it’s important to think about cleaning up old feed lying on the ground in the paddock, microorganism can start to grow there and we don’t want the horses eating that.

 

 


Later in the season it can be necessary to support the pasture with additional forage bales. This is especially important for horses with high energy and protein requirements, like lactating mares, growing horses and high performing horses.

 

 


This graph shows the crude protein and fibre content over time for different leys, see the weeks go by in the bottom. The nutrient content of leys isn’t constant but changes as the grass grows; the protein content decreases and the fibre content increases.

 

 


This graph shows the energy and fibre content over time for different leys, see the weeks go by in the bottom. The nutrient content of leys isn’t constant but changes as the grass grows; the energy content decreases and the fibre content increases.